00 Art At Home Online Gallery

With the Covid-19 physical distancing measures in place, and clubhouse being closed until further notice, club members have been getting creative at home, and want to share their projects online.  Keep visiting this page, as more artwork and crafts are added. The webmaster will try to update at least 2 times a week, depending on how many pictures are sent.

The artwork will be posted in reverse chronology, with the newest submissions on top.

9. Margot Cormier-Splane’s Studio Page on Facebook

P.A.C. Artist Margot Cormier-Splane has been posting all sorts of projects on her studio’s Facebook Page: Margot Cormier-Splane, Art.

You do not require a Facebook account to to view the page. However, when you scroll down, Facebook will prompt you to login or create an account. Keep scrolling past the prompt and an option will appear with “Not Now” at the bottom. Click on “Not Now”, and you can keep viewing her page. She has also has an Instagram profile.

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8. “TIMMINS”, 16 X 20″ Acrylic by Karina Douglas-Takayesu April 08, 2020

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This painting was created to go towards a Facebook greeting from the staff at the Timmins Public Library. Each staff member picked a word from the phrase, “DEAR PATRONS WE MISS YOU! STAY SAFE AND KEEP READING! FROM THE TIMMINS PUBLIC LIBRARY STAFF”, and then made a sign to hold up with a picture of themselves. The photos were then put together in a collage and posted online on April 06, 2020. (The original estimated date the Library would re-open.)

The collage can be viewed here.

If you notice that the black looks quite intense, the reason is that the paint is Black 3.0, designed by Stuart Semple. It is the blackest paint available to public.

7. “Little Falls”, 16 X 20″ by Bruce MacKinnon

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“From the photo of the same falls that J. E. H. McDonald painted from in 1918.
It’s in the book In the Footsteps of the Group of Seven, by Jim and Sue Waddington. They went around and found most of the places where the group of seven painted and took pictures and showed the painting from that spot.
My challenge is to paint the same scene and compare notes.” – Bruce

6. “E.T. Melting”, 12″ X 12″ Acrylic Pour Painting by Ted O’Connor – April 05, 2020

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5. “Hot and Bothered”, Drawing / Mixed Media Collage by Nicky Alexander – April 01, 2020

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The project started out as an exercise from Carla Sonheim’s book – Drawing and Painting Imaginary Animals. Sonheim finds inspiration in broken pavements – find out more about her process inspired by sidewalk cracks and try it yourself at these two links:

https://carlasonheim.wordpress.com/2010/12/15/sidewalk-cracks-make-my-heart-jump/

https://www.carlasonheim.com/20779-2/

Sketches and construction stages of “Hot and Bothered”. 

* Click on an individual image below to see a larger version. *

 

4. Various studies in different media (watercolour, pastel, collages) by Michelle Brazeau; some works are earlier than 2020 – Submitted March 29, 2020

* Click on an individual image below to see a larger version. * 

 

3. “Shafik”: Waterborne oil on canvas board 8 X 10″ by Bruce MacKinnon – March 28, 2020

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2. White Spruce: Acrylic by Cathy Cribbs – March 27, 2020.

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1. One Thousand Origami Cranes – In Progress (62 in this photograph). Karina Douglas-Takayesu – March 27, 2020

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Karina is working on making 1000 origami cranes for a Library Display commemorating 75 years since the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945. A Japanese legend says that if you string 1000 origami cranes together, you will be granted a wish by the gods. In 1955, a young girl named Sadako Sasaki was diagnosed with Leukemia, as a result of being about 1 mile (1.6 km) away from Ground Zero at Hiroshima at the age of 2. She spent her final months folding over 1000 cranes in a wish to be well again. She succumbed to her illness at age 12 on October 25, 1955. In 1958, a statue of her holding an origami crane was unveiled at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park.